Criteria for Accrediting Engineering Programs, 2012 - 2013

Effective for evaluations during the 2012 - 2013 accreditation cycle. Incorporates all changes approved by the ABET Board of Directors as of October 29, 2011. Please contact the ABET Accreditation Department if you have questions or need assistance.

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Program Criteria for Electrical, Computer, and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Engineering, General Engineering, Engineering Physics, Engineering Science, and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Engineering Management and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Engineering Mechanics and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Environmental and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Fire Protection and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Geological and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Industrial and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Manufacturing and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Materials (1), Metallurgical (2) and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Mechanical and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Mining and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Naval Architectural, Marine Engineering, and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Nuclear, Radiological, and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Ocean and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Petroleum and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Software and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Surveying and Similarly Named Engineering Programs Program Criteria for Systems and Similarly Named Engineering Programs PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE CRITERIA

DEFINITIONS

While ABET recognizes and supports the prerogative of institutions to adopt and use the terminology of their choice, it is necessary for ABET volunteers and staff to have a consistent understanding of terminology. With that purpose in mind, the Commissions will use the following basic definitions:

Program Educational Objectives
Program educational objectives are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years after graduation. Program educational objectives are based on the needs of the program’s constituencies.

Student Outcomes
Student outcomes describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. These relate to the knowledge, skills, and behaviors that students acquire as they progress through the program.

Assessment
Assessment is one or more processes that identify, collect, and prepare data to evaluate the attainment of student outcomes and program educational objectives. Effective assessment uses relevant direct, indirect, quantitative and qualitative measures as appropriate to the outcome or objective being measured. Appropriate sampling methods may be used as part of an assessment process.

Evaluation
Evaluation is one or more processes for interpreting the data and evidence accumulated through assessment processes. Evaluation determines the extent to which student outcomes and program educational objectives are being attained. Evaluation results in decisions and actions regarding program improvement.

The criteria for accreditation are in two sections.

  1. General Criteria apply to all programs accredited by an ABET commission. Each program accredited by an ABET commission must satisfy every Criterion that is in the General Criteria for that commission.
  2. Program Criteria provide discipline specific accreditation criteria. Programs must show that they satisfy all of the specific Program Criteria implied by the program title. Any overlapping requirements need be satisfied only once.

This document contains three sections:

The first section includes important definitions used by all ABET commissions.

The second section contains the General Criteria for Baccalaureate Level Programs that must be satisfied by all programs accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET and the General Criteria for Masters Level Programs that must be satisfied by those programs seeking advanced level accreditation.

The third section contains the Program Criteria that must be satisfied by certain programs. The applicable Program Criteria are determined by the technical specialties indicated by the title of the program. Overlapping requirements need to be satisfied only once.

These criteria are intended to assure quality and to foster the systematic pursuit of improvement in the quality of engineering education that satisfies the needs of constituencies in a dynamic and competitive environment. It is the responsibility of the institution seeking accreditation of an engineering program to demonstrate clearly that the program meets the following criteria.

I. GENERAL CRITERIA FOR BACCALAUREATE LEVEL PROGRAMS

 All programs seeking accreditation from the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET must demonstrate that they satisfy all of the following General Criteria for Baccalaureate Level Programs.

Criterion 1. Students

Student performance must be evaluated. Student progress must be monitored to foster success in attaining student outcomes, thereby enabling graduates to attain program educational objectives. Students must be advised regarding curriculum and career matters.

The program must have and enforce policies for accepting both new and transfer students, awarding appropriate academic credit for courses taken at other institutions, and awarding appropriate academic credit for work in lieu of courses taken at the institution. The program must have and enforce procedures to ensure and document that students who graduate meet all graduation requirements.
 

General Criterion 2. Program Educational Objectives

The program must have published program educational objectives that are consistent with the mission of the institution, the needs of the program’s various constituencies, and these criteria. There must be a documented and effective process, involving program constituencies, for the periodic review and revision of these program educational objectives.

General Criterion 3. Student Outcomes

The program must have documented student outcomes that prepare graduates to attain the program educational objectives.

Student outcomes are outcomes (a) through (k) plus any additional outcomes that may be articulated by the program.

(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

(d) an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams

(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

(g) an ability to communicate effectively

(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning

(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues

(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
 

General Criterion 4. Continuous Improvement

The program must regularly use appropriate, documented processes for assessing and evaluating the extent to which both the program educational objectives and the student outcomes are being attained. The results of these evaluations must be systematically utilized as input for the continuous improvement of the program. Other available information may also be used to assist in the continuous improvement of the program.  

General Criterion 5. Curriculum

 The curriculum requirements specify subject areas appropriate to engineering but do not prescribe specific courses. The faculty must ensure that the program curriculum devotes adequate attention and time to each component, consistent with the outcomes and objectives of the program and institution. The professional component must include:

(a) one year of a combination of college level mathematics and basic sciences (some with experimental experience) appropriate to the discipline. Basic sciences are defined as biological, chemical, and physical sciences.

(b) one and one-half years of engineering topics, consisting of engineering sciences and engineering design appropriate to the student's field of study. The engineering sciences have their roots in mathematics and basic sciences but carry knowledge further toward creative application. These studies provide a bridge between mathematics and basic sciences on the one hand and engineering practice on the other. Engineering design is the process of devising a system, component, or process to meet desired needs. It is a decision-making process (often iterative), in which the basic sciences, mathematics, and the engineering sciences are applied to convert resources optimally to meet these stated needs.

(c) a general education component that complements the technical content of the curriculum and is consistent with the program and institution objectives.

Students must be prepared for engineering practice through a curriculum culminating in a major design experience based on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier course work and incorporating appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints.

One year is the lesser of 32 semester hours (or equivalent) or one-fourth of the total credits required for graduation.
 

General Criterion 6. Faculty

 The faculty must be of sufficient number and must have the competencies to cover all of the curricular areas of the program. There must be sufficient faculty to accommodate adequate levels of student-faculty interaction, student advising and counseling, university service activities, professional development, and interactions with industrial and professional practitioners, as well as employers of students.

The program faculty must have appropriate qualifications and must have and demonstrate sufficient authority to ensure the proper guidance of the program and to develop and implement processes for the evaluation, assessment, and continuing improvement of the program, its educational objectives and outcomes. The overall competence of the faculty may be judged by such factors as education, diversity of backgrounds, engineering experience, teaching effectiveness and experience, ability to communicate, enthusiasm for developing more effective programs, level of scholarship, participation in professional societies, and licensure as Professional Engineers.
 

General Criterion 7. Facilities

Classrooms, offices, laboratories, and associated equipment must be adequate to support attainment of the student outcomes and to provide an atmosphere conducive to learning. Modern tools, equipment, computing resources, and laboratories appropriate to the program must be available, accessible, and systematically maintained and upgraded to enable students to attain the student outcomes and to support program needs. Students must be provided appropriate guidance regarding the use of the tools, equipment, computing resources, and laboratories available to the program.

The library services and the computing and information infrastructure must be adequate to support the scholarly and professional activities of the students and faculty.
 

General Criterion 8. Institutional Support

Institutional support and leadership must be adequate to ensure the quality and continuity of the program.

Resources including institutional services, financial support, and staff (both administrative and technical) provided to the program must be adequate to meet program needs. The resources available to the program must be sufficient to attract, retain, and provide for the continued professional development of a qualified faculty. The resources available to the program must be sufficient to acquire, maintain, and operate infrastructures, facilities, and equipment appropriate for the program, and to provide an environment in which student outcomes can be attained.
 

II. GENERAL CRITERIA FOR MASTERS LEVEL PROGRAMS

 Master's level programs must develop, publish, and periodically review, educational objectives and student outcomes. The criteria for masters level programs are fulfillment of the baccalaureate level general criteria, fulfillment of program criteria appropriate to the masters level specialization area, and one academic year of study beyond the baccalaureate level. The program must demonstrate that graduates have an ability to apply masters level knowledge in a specialized area of engineering related to the program area.

Please read the FAQ for Master's Level Engineering Programs Seeking Accreditation.

III. PROGAM CRITERIA

Each program must satisfy applicable Program Criteria (if any). Program Criteria provide the specificity needed for interpretation of the baccalaureate level criteria as applicable to a given discipline. Requirements stipulated in the Program Criteria are limited to the areas of curricular topics and faculty qualifications. If a program, by virtue of its title, becomes subject to two or more sets of Program Criteria, then that program must satisfy each set of Program Criteria; however, overlapping requirements need to be satisfied only once.

Program Criteria for Aerospace and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

These program criteria apply to engineering program including "aerospace," "aeronautical," "astronautical," and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
Aeronautical engineering programs must prepare graduates to have a knowledge of aerodynamics, aerospace materials, structures, propulsion, flight mechanics, and stability and control. Astronautical engineering programs must prepare graduates to have a knowledge of orbital mechanics, space environment, attitude determination and control, telecommunications, space structures, and rocket propulsion. Aerospace engineering programs or other engineering programs combining aeronautical engineering and astronautical engineering, must prepare graduates to have knowledge covering one of the areas -- aeronautical engineering or astronautical engineering as described above -- and, in addition, knowledge of some topics from the area not emphasized. Programs must also prepare graduates to have design competence that includes integration of aeronautical or astronautical topics.

2. Faculty
Program faculty must have responsibility and sufficient authority to define, revise, implement, and achieve program objectives. The program must demonstrate that faculty teaching upper-division courses have an understanding of current professional practice in the aerospace industry.
 

Program Criteria for Agricultural and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers

These program criteria apply to engineering programs including "agricultural," "forest" and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The curriculum must include mathematics through differential equations and biological and engineering sciences consistent with the program educational objectives. The curriculum must prepare graduates to apply engineering to agriculture, aquaculture, forestry, human, or natural resources.

2. Faculty
The program shall demonstrate that those faculty members teaching courses that are primarily design in content are qualified to teach the subject matter by virtue of education and experience or professional licensure.

Program Criteria for Architectural Engineering and Similarly Named Programs

Lead Society:  American Society of Civil Engineers  
Cooperating Society:  American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers

 
 

These program criteria apply to engineering programs including "architectural" and similar modifiers in their titles.

1.   Curriculum 

The program must demonstrate that graduates can apply mathematics through differential equations, calculus-based physics, and chemistry.  The four basic architectural engineering curriculum areas are building structures, building mechanical systems, building electrical systems, and construction/construction management.  Graduates are expected to reach the synthesis (design) level in one of these areas, the application level in a second area, and the comprehension level in the remaining two areas.  The engineering topics required by the general criteria shall support the engineering fundamentals of each of these four areas at the specified level.  Graduates are expected to discuss the basic concepts of architecture in a context of architectural design and history.

The design level must be in a context that:

  1. Considers the systems or processes from other architectural engineering curricular areas,
  2. Works within the overall architectural design,
  3. Includes communication and collaboration with other design or construction team members,
  4. Includes computer-based technology and considers applicable codes and standards, and
  5. Considers fundamental attributes of building performance and sustainability.

2.   Faculty 

The program must demonstrate that faculty teaching courses that are primarily engineering design in content are qualified to teach the subject matter by virtue of professional licensure, or by education and design experience.  It must also demonstrate that the majority of the faculty members teaching architectural design courses are qualified to teach the subject matter by virtue of professional licensure, or by education and design experience.

Program Criteria for Bioengineering and Biomedical and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Biomedical Engineering Society
Cooperating Societies: American Ceramic Society
American Institute of Chemical Engineers,
American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers,
American Society of Mechanical Engineers,
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers


These program criteria apply to engineering programs including “bioengineering,” “biomedical,” and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The structure of the curriculum must provide both breadth and depth across the range of engineering topics implied by the title of the program. The program must prepare graduates to have: an understanding of biology and physiology, and the capability to apply advanced mathematics (including differential equations and statistics), science, and engineering to solve the problems at the interface of engineering and biology; the curriculum must prepare graduates with the ability to make measurements on and interpret data from living systems, addressing the problems associated with the interaction between living and non-living materials and systems.
 

Program Criteria for Biological and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
Cooperating Societies: American Ceramic Society
American Academy of Environmental Engineers,
American Institute of Chemical Engineers,
American Society of Civil Engineers,
American Society of Mechanical Engineers,
Biomedical Engineering Society,
CSAB,
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers,
Institute of Industrial Engineers,
Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society,

These program criteria apply to engineering programs including “biological,” “biological systems,” “food,” and similar modifiers in their titles with the exception of bioengineering and biomedical engineering programs.

1. Curriculum
The curriculum must include mathematics through differential equations, a thorough grounding in chemistry and biology and a working knowledge of advanced biological sciences consistent with the program educational objectives. The curriculum must prepare graduates to apply engineering to biological systems.

2. Faculty
The program shall demonstrate that those faculty members teaching courses that are primarily design in content are qualified to teach the subject matter by virtue of education and experience or professional licensure.
 

Program Criteria for Ceramic and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Ceramic Society

These program criteria apply to engineering programs including "ceramic," "glass," and other similar modifiers in their titles. All programs in the materials related areas share these criteria, including programs with materials, materials processing, ceramics, glass, polymer, metallurgical, and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The curriculum must prepare graduates to apply advanced science (such as chemistry and physics) and engineering principles to materials systems; to have an integrated understanding of scientific and engineering principles underlying the four major elements of the field, viz. structure, properties, processing, and performance, related to the material systems appropriate to the field; to apply and integrate knowledge from each of the above four elements of the field to solve material selection and design problems; and to utilize experimental, statistical, and computational methods consistent with the program educational objectives.

2. Faculty
The faculty expertise for the professional area must encompass the above four major elements of the field.
 

Program Criteria for Chemical, Biochemical, Biomolecular, and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Institute of Chemical Engineers

These program criteria apply to engineering programs that include “chemical,” “biochemical,” “biomolecular,” and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum 

The curriculum must provide a thorough grounding in the basic sciences including chemistry, physics, and/or biology, with some content at an advanced level, as appropriate to the objectives of the program. The curriculum must include the engineering application of these basic sciences to the design, analysis, and control of chemical, physical, and/or biological processes, including the hazards associated with these processes.

Program Criteria for Civil and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Society of Civil Engineers

These program criteria apply to engineering programs including "civil" and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The program must prepare graduates to apply knowledge of mathematics through differential equations, calculus-based physics, chemistry, and at least one additional area of basic science, consistent with the program educational objectives; apply knowledge of four technical areas appropriate to civil engineering; conduct civil engineering experiments and analyze and interpret the resulting data; design a system, component, or process in more than one civil engineering context; explain basic concepts in management, business, public policy, and leadership; and explain the importance of professional licensure.

2. Faculty
The program must demonstrate that faculty teaching courses that are primarily design in content are qualified to teach the subject matter by virtue of professional licensure, or by education and design experience. The program must demonstrate that it is not critically dependent on one individual.
 

Program Criteria for Construction and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Society of Civil Engineers

These program criteria apply to engineering programs including "construction" and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The program must prepare graduates to apply knowledge of mathematics through differential and integral calculus, probability and statistics, general chemistry, and calculus-based physics; to analyze and design construction processes and systems in a construction engineering specialty field, applying knowledge of methods, materials, equipment, planning, scheduling, safety, and cost analysis; to explain basic legal and ethical concepts and the importance of professional engineering licensure in the construction industry; to explain basic concepts of management topics such as economics, business, accounting, communications, leadership, decision and optimization methods, engineering economics, engineering management, and cost control.

2. Faculty
The program must demonstrate that the majority of faculty teaching courses that are primarily design in content are qualified to teach the subject matter by virtue of professional licensure, or by education and design experience. The faculty must include at least one member who has had full-time experience and decision-making responsibilities in the construction industry.
 

Program Criteria for Electrical, Computer, and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Cooperating Society for Computer Engineering Programs: CSAB


These program criteria apply to engineering programs that include electrical, electronic, computer, or similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The structure of the curriculum must provide both breadth and depth across the range of engineering topics implied by the title of the program.

The curriculum must include probability and statistics, including applications appropriate to the program name; mathematics through differential and integral calculus; sciences (defined as biological, chemical, or physical science); and engineering topics (including computing science) necessary to analyze and design complex electrical and electronic devices, software, and systems containing hardware and software components.

The curriculum for programs containing the modifier “electrical” in the title must include advanced mathematics, such as differential equations, linear algebra, complex variables, and discrete mathematics.

The curriculum for programs containing the modifier “computer” in the title must include discrete mathematics.
 

Program Criteria for Engineering, General Engineering, Engineering Physics, Engineering Science, and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Society of Engineering Education
These program criteria apply to engineering (without modifiers), general engineering, engineering physics, engineering science(s), and similarly named engineering programs.

There are no program-specific criteria beyond the General Criteria.
 

Program Criteria for Engineering Management and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Institute of Industrial Engineers
Cooperating Societies: American Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers,
Society of Manufacturing Engineers, and Society of Petroleum Engineers


These program criteria apply to engineering programs using management or similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The curriculum must prepare graduates to understand the engineering relationships between the management tasks of planning, organization, leadership, control, and the human element in production, research, and service organizations; to understand and deal with the stochastic nature of management systems. The curriculum must also prepare graduates to integrate management systems into a series of different technological environments.

2. Faculty
The major professional competence of the faculty must be in engineering, and the faculty should be experienced in the management of engineering and/or technical activities.
 

Program Criteria for Engineering Mechanics and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Society of Mechanical Engineers

These program criteria apply to engineering programs which include mechanics or similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The program curriculum must require students to use mathematical and computational techniques to analyze, model, and design physical systems consisting of solid and fluid components under steady state and transient conditions.

2. Faculty
The program must demonstrate that faculty members responsible for the upper-level professional program are maintaining currency in their specialty area.
 

Program Criteria for Environmental and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Academy of Environmental Engineers
Cooperating Societies: American Institute of Chemical Engineers,
American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers,
American Society of Civil Engineers,
American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers,
American Society of Mechanical Engineers,
SAE International,
Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration


These program criteria apply to engineering programs including "environmental", "sanitary," or similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The program must prepare graduates to be proficient in mathematics through differential equations, probability and statistics, calculus-based physics, general chemistry; an earth science, e.g., geology, meteorology, soil science, relevant to the program of study; a biological science, e.g., microbiology, aquatic biology, toxicology, relevant to the program of study; fluid mechanics relevant to the program of study; introductory level knowledge of environmental issues associated with air, land, and water systems and associated environmental health impacts; conducting laboratory experiments and critically analyzing and interpreting data in more than one major environmental engineering focus area, e.g., air, water, land, environmental health; performing engineering design by means of design experiences integrated throughout the professional component of the curriculum; to be proficient in advanced principles and practice relevant to the program objectives; understanding of concepts of professional practice and the roles and responsibilities of public institutions and private organizations pertaining to environmental engineering.

2. Faculty
The program must demonstrate that a majority of those faculty teaching courses which are primarily design in content are qualified to teach the subject matter by virtue of professional licensure, or by education and equivalent design experience.

Program Criteria for Fire Protection and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Society for Fire Protection Engineers 

These program criteria apply to engineering programs including “fire protection” and similar modifiers in their title.

1. Curriculum
The program must prepare graduates to have proficiency in the application of science and engineering to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public from the impacts of fire.  This includes the ability to apply and incorporate an understanding of the fire dynamics that affect the life safety of occupants and emergency responders and the protection of property; the hazards associated with processes and building designs; the design of fire protection products, systems, and equipment; the human response and behavior in fire emergencies; and the prevention, control, and extinguishment of fire.

2. Faculty
The program must demonstrate that faculty members maintain currency in fire protection engineering practice.

Program Criteria for Geological and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration

These program criteria apply to engineering programs that include "geological" and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The program must prepare graduates to have:

(1) the ability to apply mathematics including differential equations, calculus-based physics, and chemistry, to geological engineering problems;

(2) proficiency in geological science topics that emphasize geologic processes and the identification of minerals and rocks;

(3) the ability to visualize and solve geological problems in three and four dimensions;

(4) proficiency in the engineering sciences including statics, properties/strength of materials, and geomechanics;

(5) the ability to apply principles of geology, elements of geophysics, geological and engineering field methods; and

(6) engineering knowledge to design solutions to geological engineering problems, which will include one or more of the following considerations: the distribution of physical and chemical properties of earth materials, including surface water, ground water (hydrogeology), and fluid hydrocarbons; the effects of surface and near-surface natural processes; the impacts of construction projects; the impacts of exploration, development, and extraction of natural resources, and consequent remediation; disposal of wastes; and other activities of society on these materials and processes, as appropriate to the program objectives.

2. Faculty
Evidence must be provided that the program’s faculty members understand professional engineering practice and maintain currency in their respective professional areas. The program’s faculty must have responsibility and authority to define, revise, implement, and achieve program objectives.
 

Program Criteria for Industrial and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Institute of Industrial Engineers

These program criteria apply to engineering programs using industrial or similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The curriculum must prepare graduates to design, develop, implement, and improve integrated systems that include people, materials, information, equipment and energy. The curriculum must include in-depth instruction to accomplish the integration of systems using appropriate analytical, computational, and experimental practices.

2. Faculty
Evidence must be provided that the program faculty understand professional practice and maintain currency in their respective professional areas. Program faculty must have responsibility and sufficient authority to define, revise, implement, and achieve program objectives.
 

Program Criteria for Manufacturing and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Society of Manufacturing Engineers

These program criteria apply to engineering programs that include "manufacturing" and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The program must prepare graduates to have proficiency in (a) materials and manufacturing  processes:  ability to design manufacturing processes that result in products that meet specific material and other requirements; (b) process, assembly and product engineering: ability to design products and the equipment, tooling, and environment necessary for their manufacture; (c) manufacturing competitiveness: ability to create competitive advantage through manufacturing planning, strategy, quality, and control; (d) manufacturing systems design: ability to analyze, synthesize, and control manufacturing operations using statistical methods; and (e) manufacturing laboratory or facility experience: ability to measure manufacturing process variables and develop technical inferences about the process.

2. Faculty
The program must demonstrate that faculty members maintain currency in manufacturing engineering practice.

Program Criteria for Materials (1), Metallurgical (2) and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Minerals, Metals and Materials Society
(1) Cooperating Societies for Materials Engineering Programs: American Ceramic Society,
American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and American Society of Mechanical Engineers
(2) Cooperating Society for Metallurgical Engineering Programs: Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration


These program criteria apply to engineering programs including "materials," "metallurgical," "polymer," and similar modifiers in their titles. All programs in the materials related areas share these criteria, including programs with materials, materials processing, ceramics, glass, polymer, metallurgical, and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The curriculum must prepare graduates to apply advanced science (such as chemistry and physics) and engineering principles to materials systems implied by the program modifier, e.g., ceramics, metals, polymers, composite materials; to integrate the understanding of the scientific and engineering principles underlying the four major elements of the field: structure, properties, processing, and performance related to material systems appropriate to the field; to apply and integrate knowledge from each of the above four elements of the field to solve materials selection and design problems, and; to utilize experimental, statistical, and computational methods consistent with the program educational objectives.

2. Faculty
The faculty expertise for the professional area must encompass the four major elements of the field.
 

Program Criteria for Mechanical and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Society of Mechanical Engineers

These program criteria will apply to all engineering programs including "mechanical" or similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The curriculum must require students to apply principles of engineering, basic science, and mathematics (including multivariate calculus and differential equations); to model, analyze, design, and realize physical systems, components or processes; and prepare students to work professionally in both thermal and mechanical systems areas.

2. Faculty
The program must demonstrate that faculty members responsible for the upper-level professional program are maintaining currency in their specialty area.
 

Program Criteria for Mining and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration

These program criteria apply to engineering programs including "mining" and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The program must prepare graduates to apply mathematics through differential equations, calculus-based physics, general chemistry, and probability and statistics as applied to mining engineering problem applications; to have fundamental knowledge in the geological sciences including characterization of mineral deposits, physical geology, structural or engineering geology, and mineral and rock identification and properties; to be proficient in statics, dynamics, strength of materials, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and electrical circuits; to be proficient in engineering topics related to both surface and underground mining, including: mining methods, planning and design, ground control and rock mechanics, health and safety, environmental issues, and ventilation; to be proficient in additional engineering topics such as rock fragmentation, materials handling, mineral or coal processing, mine surveying, and valuation and resource/reserve estimation as appropriate to the program objectives. The laboratory experience must prepare graduates to be proficient in geologic concepts, rock mechanics, mine ventilation, and other topics appropriate to the program objectives.

2. Faculty
Evidence must be provided that the program faculty understand professional engineering practice and maintain currency in their respective professional areas. Program faculty must have responsibility and authority to define, revise, implement, and achieve program objectives.
 

Program Criteria for Naval Architectural, Marine Engineering, and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

These program criteria apply to engineering programs including “naval architecture” and/or “marine engineering” and with similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The program must prepare graduates to apply probability and statistical methods to naval architecture and marine engineering problems; to have basic knowledge of fluid mechanics, dynamics, structural mechanics, materials properties, hydrostatics, and energy/propulsion systems in the context of marine vehicles and; to have familiarity with instrumentation appropriate to naval architecture and/or marine engineering.

2. Faculty
Program faculty must have sufficient curricular and administrative control to accomplish the program objectives. Program faculty must have responsibility and sufficient authority to define, revise, implement and achieve the program objectives.
 

Program Criteria for Nuclear, Radiological, and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Nuclear Society

These program criteria apply to engineering programs including “nuclear,” “radiological,” or similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The program must prepare the students to apply advanced mathematics, science, and engineering science, including atomic and nuclear physics, and the transport and interaction of radiation with matter, to nuclear and radiological systems and processes; to perform nuclear engineering design; to measure nuclear and radiation processes; to work professionally in one or more of the nuclear or radiological fields of specialization identified by the program.


2. Faculty
The program must demonstrate that faculty members primarily committed to the program have current knowledge of nuclear or radiological engineering by education or experience.
 

Program Criteria for Ocean and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers
Cooperating Societies: American Society of Civil Engineers
and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers


These program criteria apply to engineering programs including "ocean" and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The curriculum must prepare graduates to have the knowledge and the skills to apply the principles of fluid and solid mechanics, dynamics, hydrostatics, probability and applied statistics, oceanography, water waves, and underwater acoustics to engineering problems and to work in groups to perform engineering design at the system level, integrating multiple technical areas and addressing design optimization.

2. Faculty
Program faculty must have responsibility and sufficient authority to define, revise, implement, and achieve the program objectives.

 

Program Criteria for Petroleum and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: Society of Petroleum Engineers

These program criteria apply to engineering programs that include "petroleum," "natural gas," and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The program must prepare graduates to be proficient in mathematics through differential equations, probability and statistics, fluid mechanics, strength of materials, and thermodynamics; design and analysis of well systems and procedures for drilling and completing wells; characterization and evaluation of subsurface geological formations and their resources using geoscientific and engineering methods; design and analysis of systems for producing, injecting, and handling fluids; application of reservoir engineering principles and practices for optimizing resource development and management; the use of project economics and resource valuation methods for design and decision making under conditions of risk and uncertainty.
 

Program Criteria for Software and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: CSAB
Cooperating Society: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers


These program criteria apply to engineering programs that include “software” or similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The curriculum must provide both breadth and depth across the range of engineering and computer science topics implied by the title and objectives of the program.

The curriculum must prepare graduates to analyze, design, verify, validate, implement, apply, and maintain software systems; to appropriately apply discrete mathematics, probability and statistics, and relevant topics in computer science and supporting disciplines to complex software systems; to work in one or more significant application domains; and to manage the development of software systems
 

Program Criteria for Surveying and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Society: American Congress on Surveying and Mapping
Cooperating Society: American Society of Civil Engineers


These program criteria apply to engineering programs including "surveying" and similar modifiers in their titles.

1. Curriculum
The curriculum must prepare graduates to work competently in one or more of the following areas: boundary and/or land surveying, geographic and/or land information systems, photogrammetry, mapping, geodesy, remote sensing, and other related areas.

2. Faculty
Programs must demonstrate that faculty members teaching courses that are primarily design in content are qualified to teach the subject matter by virtue of professional licensure or by educational and design experience.
 

Program Criteria for Systems and Similarly Named Engineering Programs

Lead Societies: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, CSAB,
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Institute of Industrial Engineers,
ISA, International Council on Systems Engineering, and
SAE International


These program criteria apply to systems engineering programs without modifiers in their title.

There are no program- specific criteria beyond the General Criteria.
 

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE CRITERIA

There are no proposed changes to the EAC Criteria for the 2012-2013 accreditation review cycle.

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