Claire L. Felbinger Award for Diversity Recipients

2013

National Engineers Week Foundation

For successful creation, implementation, and growth of annual events and programs focused on inclusion of underrepresented populations into the field of engineering, including Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day, reaching 1 million K-12 girls annually; the Global Marathon For, By and About Women in Engineering and Technology, a “virtual town square” connecting women via live Internet chats, webcasts, and local events; and Future City Competition, reaching over 33,000 middle school students (46% of all participants are girls) in 36 regions across the country. Learn more. 

2012

National Action Council for Minorities in Education, Inc. (NACME)

In recognition of implementing initiatives and programs to dramatically increase the number of underrepresented minority students prepared to engage and excel in engineering education; being the nation’s largest private provider of scholarships for underrepresented minority students in engineering; and collaborating with educational partners to launch a national network of urban-centered, open enrollment, high school engineering academies to provide all students with a strong science and math education to assure college readiness for engineering study. Learn more. 

2010

The Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Diversity
in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech

For their successful development and on-going operation of programs to provide encouragement and support for diversity in engineering through pre-college programs, recruiting efforts for prospective students, and programs to support current underrepresented engineering students. Learn more. 

The Michigan College and University Partnership

For a collaborative effort between four Michigan community colleges – Ojibwa, Delta, Grand Rapids, and Wayne County Community Colleges – and Michigan Technological University for successful efforts to significantly increase the transfer of underrepresented ethnic minority, first generation and economically disadvantaged students into Michigan Tech's four-year baccalaureate program. Learn more. 

2009

The Bourns College of Engineering
at the University of California, Riverside

In recognition of extraordinarily successful initiatives for recruiting undergraduate and graduate students from diverse and disadvantaged backgrounds, retaining them through the bachelor's degree, and advancing them to graduate studies and careers in engineering. Learn more. 

The College of Engineering at Florida A&M University
and Florida State University

In recognition of the creation of a unique engineering program — formed from the partnership between a Research-1 and a historically black university — that has succeeded by being among the top five engineering programs in bachelor's degrees awarded to black students as well as among the top ten in graduate degrees, and for successfully serving more than 40,000 diverse middle and high school students through outreach programs. Learn more. 

The College of Engineering and Computer Science
at California State University, Fullerton

For its leadership and accomplishments in attaining significant achievements in diversity facilitated through innovative programs such as the Center for Academic Success in the College of Engineering and Computer Science (CASECS) and Engineering and Computer Science (ECS) Scholars. Learn more. 

2008

The College of Engineering and the Office of Diversity Initiatives
at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach

For the successful, broad, and ongoing spectrum of initiatives, including K-12 Outreach, Bridge Programs, Curriculum Enhancement, Faculty Development, and Work-Life Balance, to attract women to science, math, and engineering, to retain them through graduation, and to support them as they embark on their professional careers. Learn more. 

The School of Engineering and Applied Science
at The George Washington University

For its commitment and achievement in hiring female faculty and in recruiting, retaining, and graduating a significant number of women in undergraduate and graduate engineering programs while providing the graduates with leadership skills and opportunities as they enter engineering practice. Learn more. 

The CyberCity Technology Summer Program
at James Madison University

For the development and operation of a successful hands-on, project-based university campus summer program for underrepresented high school students and their teachers that increases awareness of information technology skills and careers and enhances the students' aspirations for a college education. Learn more. 

The Multicultural Engineering Program at Northern Arizona University and Its Director Fonda Swimmer

For their long-term and collaborative efforts to aid African-American, Hispanic, Native American, female, disabled, and first generation students in engineering, computer science, and construction management in enhancing their academic performance and reaching their full potential. Learn more. 

2007

The California State University-Los Angeles College
of Engineering, Computer Science, and Technology

For previous and ongoing promotion of MESA (Math-Engineering-Science Achievement), including sharing procedures and techniques with a broader audience in promotion of math, engineering, and science among underrepresented groups. Learn more. 

The Oklahoma State University-Okmulgee
Information Technologies Division

For success in promoting and including American Indians in the engineering and science disciplines and promotion beyond the campus borders. Learn more. 

Lee Snapp

For working with the nation's tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to create the first comprehensive program for developing, implementing, and sustaining engineering studies ever designed by and four TCUs, seeking funding for the plan's implementation, and engaging major engineering organizations such as ABET and the National Academy of Engineering to further its success.

2006

The College of Engineering and Computing
at Florida International University

For success in educating and enriching the K-16 population of FIU and its surrounding Miami Dade County through bridge programs, dual enrollment, scholarships, undergraduate research experience, and an annual open house event, Engineering Gala, that is attended by more than 1,000 local middle and high school students; and for graduating more Hispanic engineers and computer scientists than any other college in the United States (excluding Puerto Rico). Learn more. 

The Ivan G. Seidenberg School of Computer Science
and Information Systems at Pace University

For providing a supportive atmosphere for its diverse student body and actively encouraging young women to enter the field of computing by hosting the annual Women in Computing Symposium and the Trendsetters Conference on Nontraditional Careers. Learn more. 

The College of Engineering at The University of Texas at El Paso

For its commitment to providing engineering and science education to a predominantly Hispanic, economically disadvantaged region by extending outreach to precollege students, parents, and teachers in El Paso and in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico, steadily increasing the enrollment of engineering students from the area and attracting more underrepresented or economically disadvantaged students to technical disciplines. Learn more. 

2005

The University of Maryland, Baltimore County

For its distinction in producing more minority faculty than any other institution in the United States, which is critical to the growth of minority representation in the breadth of colleges and universities throughout the country. Learn more. 

The College of Engineering
at The University of Texas at San Antonio

For its impressive record in attracting and graduating minority students. During the 2002-2003 academic year, the college conferred 160 bachelor's degrees in engineering, and nearly half of them, 76, went to minority students. Fifty-eight of those degrees, or 36 percent of the overall total, were awarded to Hispanic students. The UTSA College of Engineering was recognized for this accomplishment. Learn more. 

Tulane University and Xavier University of Louisiana

For developing a cooperative program between Tulane University and Xavier University of Louisiana, a Historically Black University, whereby students from Xavier take classes at Tulane in their senior year in preparation for entering the industrial hygiene master’s program at Tulane the following year. Learn more about Tulane and Xavier.

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ABET Facts

Accredited Programs at HBCUs

Howard University was the first historically black college or university to have ABET-accredited programs. ABET's predecessor, the Engineers' Council for Professional Development, accredited three engineering programs there in 1937.